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Mary Cecilia Scully, RSM (1908–1940) was the first and longest-serving President of Mount Saint Mary College/Georgian Court College. During her term, the famous Card Party (1925) and Spring Musicale (1926) began. The Students’ Chapel bell was dedicated in her honor in 1937.

Mary John Considine, RSM, ’12 (1940–1948) became president after serving as dean of the college from its founding. In addition to the purchase of the Kearney House and its opening as Campus Club (1940-41), it was during her term that the first official “handbook” for college personnel was planned. In 1941, she was the first woman to receive an honorary degree (Doctor of Letters) from Fordham University.

Marie Anna Callahan, RSM, Ph.D., ’12 (1948–1962) served as the third president of Georgian Court College. During her helm, the college began offering courses leading to a major in elementary education (1951); and a campus division in Atlantic City started (1957).

Mary Pierre Tirrell, RSM, ’30 (1962–1968) was the fourth president of Georgian Court College. In addition to her many accomplishments, she appointed the first male academic dean in 1967. She also granted the first honorary degree in 1963.

Mary Stephanie Sloyan, RSM, Ph.D., ’39 (1968–1974) served as the fifth president of Georgian Court College. During her term, the college started participating in the New Jersey Educational Opportunity Fund for disadvantaged students. She instituted a series of meetings for representatives of administration, faculty, and students to deal with student reaction to the killings at Kent State University, the Vietnam War, and requests for changes in student life regulations. During this time, the college paid off debt to the Diocese of Trenton incurred when the college purchased the former Gould estate.

Maria Cordis Richey, RSM, Ph.D., ’50 (1974–1980) served as the sixth president of Georgian Court College. Under her direction, the Casino Ballroom was converted into the “Court Café” and Campus Club became the Music Center. Also, the major in business administration was approved and reinstated, and the Center for Christian Concerns was initiated in 1977.

Barbara A. Williams, RSM, ’63 (1980–2000) served as the seventh and second-longest serving president of Georgian Court College. She helped the college modernize by creating the first Office of Human Resources and computerizing administrative offices, and brought the athletics program to the national level. She also guided Georgian Court in planning for the future by adding academic programs, gaining accreditations, building the endowment, renovating historic buildings, and constructing new spaces as Georgian Court’s enrollment doubled during her tenure.

Rosemary E. Jeffries, RSM, Ph.D., ’72 (2001–2015) was the eighth president of GCU. President Jeffries, a Catholic Sister of Mercy, brought with her an understanding of higher education and both secular and religious leadership experiences, and shepherded the institution through the transition from college to university in 2004. In 2013, she led the university through its shift to a fully coeducational university. She spearheaded the largest fund-raising effort in the university’s history, the Campaign for Georgian Court, which raised $17.2 million in 2008 and exceeded its original goal of $15 million.